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Nature
RIP Polly Higgins - the green movement grieves its lost hero

RIP Polly Higgins - the green movement grieves its lost hero

Eco-warrior and legal pioneer Polly Higgins dies at 50

Nature
Artifishal - the high costs of aquaculture and human ignorance

Artifishal - the high costs of aquaculture and human ignorance

Documentary produced by Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard about the protection of wild fish

Nature
Rainforest in Ecuador threatened by mining

Rainforest in Ecuador threatened by mining

Giant copper mining corporations BHP and Codelco close in on 243,000 hectares of rainforest - how you can help

Nature
Don't go with Charmin toilet paper

Don't go with Charmin toilet paper

15% of deforestation is due to toilet paper alone

Culture
Time of the Sixth Sun

Time of the Sixth Sun

Documentary film about the shift in global consciousness and the emerging movement to find a new way to walk more lightly on this Earth

Culture
Jonathan Pie on Extinction Rebellion

Jonathan Pie on Extinction Rebellion

Pie joins the Extinction Rebellion protest that is helping save the planet whilst annoying commuters

Today's reading list
Nature

RIP Polly Higgins - the green movement grieves its lost hero

Eco-warrior and legal pioneer Polly Higgins dies at 50

Internationally renowned visionary and legal pioneer Polly Higgins died peacefully on Easter Sunday at Leckhampton Court Hospice after being diagnosed only last month with a rapid and pervasive cancer. She was 50 years old. Polly had spent the last few - and happiest - years of her life living in Stroud, where for the first time she felt part of a truly supportive local community.

Polly's mission, to which she dedicated her last 10 years, was taking forward an international crime of Ecocide to stand alongside War Crimes, Genocide and Crimes Against Humanity at the International Criminal Court. Making CEOs and government ministers liable to criminal prosecution for causing or contributing to the large-scale destruction of ecosystems was a "trim tab with the power to turn the whole ship around", she explained. "Ecocide law is in alignment with a higher moral law we can all recognise, based on a principle of 'first do no harm' ."

She advised many governments, and inspired audiences across the world with her passion and refusal to compromise. In the week before her death she saw her call being taken up by the fast-growing climate activist movement Extinction Rebellion, itself born in Stroud.

Dr Gail Bradbrook, co-founder of Extinction Rebellion, said: "Polly Higgins was a great soul, an inspiration and a friend. Her encouragement and practical support helped us to get Extinction Rebellion going. We will all miss her so much but know she is with us as we take her work forwards to protect life on Earth."

In 2017 she co-founded a global open Trust Fund to enable the public to support her legal campaign as Earth Protectors (see www.StopEcocide.earth), an unusual approach to crowdfunding which also provides activists who sign up with evidence that they are acting as Conscientious Protectors to prevent and protect from serious harm (rather than as criminals causing it).

Polly's close colleague and co-founder of the Earth Protectors campaign, local eco-activist Jojo Mehta, said: "Polly was the most generous, most exciting and most inspiring person to work with and my deepest, dearest friend. She was both razor-sharp and deeply compassionate, and had an extraordinary talent for making people feel safe even while rearranging their world-view with her ground-breaking work. She will be keenly missed by thousands, but her spirit will live on in many thousands more, because what she worked for - what her team continues to work for - really does have the power to change history. It rekindles hope - not that we can preserve society as we know it, but that if we act now, we can move through this crisis into a world that operates very differently indeed... a world based on a principle of 'first do no harm' "

Polly had no children but is survived by her loving husband HH Judge Ian Lawrie QC, resident judge at Gloucester Crown Court.

Nature

Artifishal - the high costs of aquaculture and human ignorance

Documentary produced by Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard about the protection of wild fish

Last week, Patagonia released Artifishal—an illuminating 80-minute investigative documentary film by Liars & Thieves. The film explores the high cost—ecological, financial and cultural—of our mistaken belief that engineered solutions can make up for habitat destruction. It traces the impact of fish hatcheries and farms and the extraordinary amount of American tax dollars wasted on an industry that hinders wild fish recovery, pollutes our rivers and contributes to the problem it claims to solve.

Patagonia founder and executive producer Yvon Chouinard and director/producer Josh “Bones” Murphy bring us Artifishal to tell the story of fish hatcheries and fish farms from California to Norway. We witness the conditions of factory fish farms as well as the genetically inferior, dumbed-down salmon they churn out. The film explores the repercussions of a wrecked net pen and the underwater destruction and disease caused by an open-water fish farm. And after the largest dam removal project in the United States, we watch government waste in action: $320 million on hatcheries after wild fish had been restored in their natural habitat. But the film also gives us hope and reminds us of nature’s resilience. In examples in Montana and Washington, after hatcheries were shut down, wild fish rebound.

Humans have always thought of themselves as superior to nature and it’s got us into a lot of trouble. We think we can control nature; we can’t,” notes Yvon Chouinard, Patagonia founder. “If we value wild salmon, we need to do something now. A life without wild nature and a life without these great, iconic species is an impoverished life. If we lose all wild species, we’re going to lose ourselves.

Patagonia was founded over 40 years ago by a dirtbag climber who wanted to explore wild places. The company is still in business today because it fights to protect lands and waters all around the world. The company is suing the Trump administration in an effort to protect public lands and has donated over $100 million to environmental nonprofits working on the most pressing challenges facing our planet. This film is the third in a trilogy about rivers by Patagonia, following DamNation and Blue Heart.

Nature

Rainforest in Ecuador threatened by mining

Giant copper mining corporations BHP and Codelco close in on 243,000 hectares of rainforest - how you can help

243,000 hectares of rainforest in the Cotachaci Cayapas nature reserve threatened by mining

We received an email from Ned Cresswell, an organic farmer and biologist living in Ecuador, politely requesting help to protect his valley in the Intag region of South America.

What’s the problem?

Some of the world’s largest copper mining companies (BHP, Codelco) are planning to develop the region. With the consequence that the natural area will be destroyed.

The Intag zone of Ecuador, where Ned lives, covers an area of 150,000 hectares (1,500 square kilometres). At present, 90,000 hectares (70% of the area) have been concessioned to mining companies. Although these figures frequently change as more areas are concessioned.

In the Intag area, the mining concessions include many towns and villages, hundreds of streams and rivers, thousands of hectares of primary forests and the 6,900 hectare Los Cedros reserve.

The Los Cedros reserve is home to over 400 species of birds, 6 species of big cat, hundreds of other mammals and amphibians, many in danger of extinction, including a unique species of spider monkey.

More importantly, the mining concessions adjoin and are within the buffer zone of the 243,000 hectare Cotacachi Cayapas nature reserve.

The area covering 243,000 hectares of forest in the Cotachaci Cayapas nature reserve was established in 1968 to specifically protect:

• 689 species of birds, 139 mammals, 111 species amphibians, 124 reptiles.

• Wolves, jaguars, bears and pumas.

• Endemic nature in danger of extinction.

Anyone with a concern for nature will see why this is worth a few minutes of their time.

We all lead busy lives.

Yet this video makes you stop and think. If we do anything, surely it must start with protecting the rainforest. Championing the shift to clean energy and sustainable food production is pointless at the expense of the most precious nature reserves.

If one person sees this video who can help, please contact Ned Cresswell (Eduardo in the video) by email:

nedcreswell@yahoo.com.

And thank you to everyone who watches the video.

Please share this link as you never know what may happen.

One butterfly flaps its wings and sends a ripple through the air, that cascades across the world. The butterfly effect.

We believe in butterflys.

For more information see:

http://www.decoin.org/

https://johnseed.net/LosCedrosSummary.htm

https://www.cotacachi.eu/en/cayapas/la-reserve-cotacachi-cayapas

Sign the petition against oil drilling

I’m writing because I want to ask you to support the indigenous Waorani people in their battle to protect half-a-million acres of their rainforest homelands in the Ecuadorian Amazon from oil drilling. In less than two weeks, an Ecuadorian court will make a decision that could halt the auctioning of their lands to the oil companies and protect their forests. But the Ecuadorian judicial system is under pressure from the government and the fossil fuel industry to sway the verdict.

The time for action is now! I have signed an urgent petition supporting indigenous rights, rainforest protection and climate justice! Will you join me in signing this petition, and ensuring that the judges in Ecuador know that the world is watching this landmark human rights case!

Join me by signing their petition, then share it with five other people: https://waoresist.amazonfrontlines.org/action/