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Are pigs on factory farms REALLY eating more fish than sharks? New report out on deviant industry

Are pigs on factory farms REALLY eating more fish than sharks? New report out on deviant industry

The fishmeal and fish oil (FMFO) industry is devastating the seas and earning immense profits perverting food chains in multiple deviant ways

Technology
Unique opportunity - learn to build a tropical Earthship - 4 week intensive course

Unique opportunity - learn to build a tropical Earthship - 4 week intensive course

You can join the Earthship Academy in Haiti in January 2020 constructing a self sufficient school to help local children

Nature
You could live in this dream eco home for less than the price of a 1 bed London flat

You could live in this dream eco home for less than the price of a 1 bed London flat

Extraordinary and exemplary Earth Ship with land in Wales on the market now and available to buy

Technology
Five ways solar power is improving lives

Five ways solar power is improving lives

Aside from tackling the climate emergency, solar is creating essential new income, jobs and services

Technology
One corporation to pollute them all

One corporation to pollute them all

Cruise giant - Carnival Corporation - emits 10 times more air pollution than all of Europe’s cars – study

Culture
No Song

No Song

A new poem by Aidan Andrew Dun

Today's reading
Nature

Are pigs on factory farms REALLY eating more fish than sharks? New report out on deviant industry

The fishmeal and fish oil (FMFO) industry is devastating the seas and earning immense profits perverting food chains in multiple deviant ways

The oceans used to be abundant with life. Today, 90% of big fish have been removed from the sea by industrial vessels. With this "resource" depleted a new type of extractive profiteering has emerged. Unscrupulous corporations hoover all accessible small fish out of an area of ocean. This is ground into pellets in factories and used as a protein-rich ingredient in many unnatural modern supply lines including with factory farmed salmon.

Previously captain Paul Watson of Sea Shepherd expressed his horror at marine food chains being destroyed to feed caged animals suffering in factory farms on land claiming "pigs eat more fish then sharks"-

We are feeding fish to cats, pigs, and chickens, and we are sucking tens of thousands of small fish from the sea to feed larger fish raised in cages. House cats are eating more fish than seals; pigs are eating more fish than sharks; and factory-farmed chickens are eating more fish than puffins and albatross.

Last week, a new report came out from Greenpeace calling on West African governments to immediately phase out the wasteful fishmeal and fish oil (FMFO) industry, to stop the threat to regional fish stocks essential for the food security and livelihoods of local people, outlined in a new Greenpeace report released last week.

Dutch super trawler Dirk Diederik 30 miles off the coast of Mauritania. Visible on deck is a floating device which was attached earlier in the day by Greenpeace activists onto the net cable with the words "Stop the plunder". © Pierre Gleizes / Greenpeace

Shockingly, giant industrial fishing vessels from developed nations are plundering the seas of the West Coast of Africa. These fish are ground up in polluting factories and then used as feed for factory farmed animals that live lives of unimaginable torment. Is this gross perversion of natural systems the dark heart of intensive animal agriculture that drives The Sixth Mass Extinction hardest?

Everyday life in the Fishing Village of Fass Boye, Senegal. © Elodie Martial / Greenpeace

The report, entitled A waste of fish: Food security under threat from the fishmeal and fish oil industry in West Africa, raises strong concerns about the expanding FMFO industry in Mauritania, Senegal and The Gambia. All three species of fish used for FMFO are essential for food security, and already overexploited.

“We’re losing hundreds of thousands of tonnes of edible fish to fishmeal and fish oil exports, potentially impacting 40 million African consumers. West African governments must protect regional fish stocks and put the food security rights of their citizens first, by quickly decreasing the amount of fish going into fishmeal production,” said Dr. Ibrahima Cissé, Oceans Campaign Manager for Greenpeace Africa.

Soumbedioune Fish Market © Greenpeace / Pierre Gleizes

“Decades of overfishing and government inaction have degraded regional fish stocks. Now the fishmeal industry is aggravating the problem to a critical level; taking fish from people’s plates to feed fish farms, pigs or poultry in faraway markets. Catches that could be made by artisanal fishermen and the women who process them – which could feed low income families – is exported to be used as animal feed. It makes no sense.”, added Ibrahima Cissé.

Greenpeace has found 50 operational FMFO factories in the region, 40 of which were active in March 2019. The majority of West African FMFO is destined for overseas markets, largely Asia and the EU. Exports of FMFO from Mauritania have doubled between 2014 and 2018, making this country now the largest exporter of fishmeal and fish oil in the region. In 2017, it was estimated that nearly 550,000 tonnes of pelagic fish were harvested to supply FMFO processing plants in Mauritania.

The growing FMFO industry is not only threatening regional fish stocks but affecting livelihoods and food security. About 80 % of fish landings in Senegal come from the artisanal sector, and fish provides around 70% of the population’s animal protein needs, and over 50% of protein needs in The Gambia.[4][5]

Greenpeace Africa calls on West African governments and companies to face their responsibilities in the much-needed protection of regional fish stocks, as well as prioritise basic human rights: food security and the livelihoods of artisanal fishermen and women processors. “We have to put fish back on people’s tables, before satisfying industrial farming,” concluded Dr. Cissé.

Sign the petition - Give back #StolenFish

Technology

Unique opportunity - learn to build a tropical Earthship - 4 week intensive course

You can join the Earthship Academy in Haiti in January 2020 constructing a self sufficient school to help local children

Complete Earthship Academy in Haiti in January.

This program will have classes in the morning, and practice on the construction site every day, from Monday to Saturday, during 4 weeks. We will build an Earthship from start to finish. This tropical Earthship model is one of the most resistant to Earthquakes and hurricanes and yet uses simple and affordable building techniques. This construction is totally self sufficient, with all Earthship features such as water harvesting and filtering, upcycling materials, food production, safe sewage treatment, clean energy and much more..

Your tuition fee pays for a part of the materials for the school but also helps local people to come and participate to the Earthship Academy, so they would then be able to build self sufficient houses across Haiti!

TUITION FEE: $ 3000 USD

If you want to learn to build an Earthship, while participating to the construction of the FIRST self sufficient school in Haiti to help some children and local people, then this is the right project for you!

Michael Reynolds, the renowned “Garbage Warrior” and his team from Earthship Biotecture will be in Haiti to offer an exclusive training in self sufficient home construction. Michael Reynolds has been a world leader in sustainable architecture for more than 45 years, designing and building fully self-contained homes made from a significant amount of natural and repurposed materials.

These houses are called Earthships and have been built all over the world. M. Reynolds is the initiator of three Earthships Communities and author of several books. He appears regularly on radio, television, in movies and print media worldwide, and was also invited to give talks about his innovations around the World, including: The Swedish Parliament, KTH Royal Institute of Technology, National Technical Library in Prague, the World Summit Welfare Project in Melbourne and Ted talks. The last two public schools that Earthship Biotecture built in Uruguay and Chile, received visits from presidents of both countries.

International Earthship Academy

This International Earthship Academy will be limited to only 30 students and will teach them how to build their own self sufficient home in just one month, while building a primary school.

The Academy will build the first Earthship school in La Gonave, Haiti. Haiti has a very rich culture, stunning landscape, great food, delightful music, and friendly people.

Earthships heat and cool themselves passively, produce their own electricity, collect and filter their water, treat their wastewater, and grow a large amount of food to feed the people who inhabit them. The Earthship Academy offers a complete 4 week training to learn how to build one of these homes. Alternating practice and theory, it is perfect for all those who wish to learn to live autonomously. Earthships take the by-products of modern society (garbage), and use these materials by incorporating them into the buildings.

Each Earthship uses between 500-5000 tires, glass, scrap cardboard, plastic bottles, metal harvested from old appliances.The Earthship Academy offers in-depth training on the principles of Earthship design and construction methods.

The Academy's classes, laboratories,practical building techniques are led by Michael Reynolds and a high-level staff of electricians, plumbers, and more…

This Earthship Academy program will start on the 6th of January, 2020 and will end the 31st of January, 2020.

The tuition fee is $ 3000 USD for the entire program, including lunches every day, as well as free camping near the building site.The tuition fee of the students helps buying the materials to build the school, but also sponsors several Haitians to attend the Earthship Academy.

For more information, please visit: www.earthshipglobal.com/haiti

You can also email - outreach@earthship.com

Nature

You could live in this dream eco home for less than the price of a 1 bed London flat

Extraordinary and exemplary Earth Ship with land in Wales on the market now and available to buy

This extraordinary and exemplary eco home (hobbit mansion), surrounding lands and greenhouses are on the market and available to buy now. Offers above £250k will be considered. Read on to find out more…

All photos by Simon Dale \_©_

Living the Wild Dream in an Age of Control

We live in a time of unprecedented uncertainty, a crossroads for the future of humanity. We can no longer believe the news, governments or the claims of science or religion and yet we must carry on and do our best. Ours hearts and minds crave beauty, genuine connection with the earth and the space and opportunity to help regenerate our ecosystems and culture.

Wales made a unique choice to legalise living simply on the earth in exchange for enhancing biodiversity, building naturally and living with the land. A dream come true for us, to transform bare, denuded fields into a biodiverse haven. The chance to source hydro-electric from the river, drink fresh spring water and exercise response-ability for our impact on the earth.

This is our story

It took many years to receive consent to make our smallholding in Wales, throughout that time we lived nearby and carefully observed the landform, water, wind, sun and soil of our windy, empty fields. This waiting, though frustrating, proved a treasure as by the time we moved into our tent and began tree planting and building, we had cultivated an embodied awareness of this place.

Our dream of restoring natural processes and species also required us to grow food, firewood, make a livelihood and build all the infrastructures to make this possible. This meant creating dwellings from timber, stone and subsoils at the site. Within months of arriving we had built a warm, dry, carbon neutral roundhouse set into the hillside for protection and warmth. Setting up basic services, such as a network to bring spring water to the homes and refurbishing the hydro-electric turbine, took lots of expertise, man hours, finance, sweat and love.

Bringing the land to life

Personally, my priority was to catalyse the natural processes laying dormant on this land, seemingly bereft of life, and create sheltered micro-climates from the heavy winds and rain. Plants and houses benefit from protection from strong winds. Food gardens need complex beneficial relationships to flourish and be resilient to pests, disease, drought, cold and heat. The imperative therefore was to establish biodiversity.

With a great respect for nature, we were humbled by the enthusiasm and intelligence of natural systems to come back into equilibrium with just a little input from us humans. The first year, saw the proliferation of insects as the grasses went to seed and meadow herbs we’d sown took root. The air came alive with insects, butterflies and bees, soon followed by birds. We let hedges sprawl and supplemented them with wild cherry, elder and autumn olive. Allowing natural succession of thorny scrub, such as gorse and blackthorn and bramble, created safe nesting sites and an extensive habitat corridor. By adding edible species for our harvest, and actively creating organic matter and valuing deadwood, we saw the explosion of diversity and beginnings of food self-reliance.

Tree planting

By year 3, we’d planted nearly a 1000 soil repair trees, creating a sheltered microclimate. Hundreds of fruit bushes from cuttings, now yielded tens of kilos of fruit. Around every cultivated area we encouraged wild edges of yarrow, foxglove, dandelion, St John’s Wort and comfrey. We filled in every gap with edible perennials, such as wild garlic, mints and strawberries, and marvelled at the living, breathing network of life around us. The soil was deeper, darker and teeming with earthworms. Natural predators such as hoverflies, beetles and ladybirds arrived to keep aphids and slugs at bay and every stone or log harboured a toad sitting silently beneath it.

The hobbit mansion and greenhouses

Around 2013 we started building our main house, a hobbit mansion, intended to last for generations, carefully designed to withstand whatever climate extremes might come. Huge glasshouses were skilfully constructed to heat it, in which grapes, peaches and vegetables thrived, providing food all through the winters too. Over 400 people camped with us over the years to help build and beautiful memories of that time are treasured. On New Year’s Day 2018, the house burnt down in a freak accident before completion, since then we have reassessed everything and decided to have a fresh start. However rewarding the process has been, we are exhausted and our children at an age where embarking on rebuilding is not an option.

So here we are 18 months after the fire. We offer this haven for sale to the right people. Providing your own water, firewood and electric means work and also has the deep reward of taking responsibility for your own needs and knowing that it does not harm others. Being in close relationship to the seasons, growing food and witnessing nature’s reciprocity is a precious gift in these troubled times.

A more detailed description of the property is on www.beingsomewhere.net